Yesterday a Client and I had a discussion on how they could work Arabesque tiles into their interior, without it being too overwhelming or bold. They love the pattern and dimension that the arabesque tile can add to a space, however were slightly worried that this traditional style tile may clash with their relatively suburban interior and kitchen design. I have always thought that the best way to illustrate to a client just how fantastic an idea could be, is to give them a visual – in this case, through a collection of inspirational images that represent exactly how the use of these tiles could work in their home.

So I thought I would put together a collection of images that could look fantastic when used in a residential interior design scheme. The great thing about this selection is their versatility! Typically Arabesque and Moroccan inspired tiles project a bold use of colour and intricate pattern, but for all those neutral palette lovers, their is a subtle colour and pattern range available in Australia that can be used as a point of difference as your splashback or counter top in your contemporary/ traditional kitchen or bathroom.

For suppliers of to find out how this style could work in with your homes interior style, don’t hesitate to contact me erica@ericafanninginteriors.com

Classic kitchen with arabesque wall/ splashback tiles

 

Powder blue splashback tiles

 

This tiled splashback adds a dramatic statement to this modern kitchen

 

Classic white

 

Powder blue for the bathroom wall tiles

 

Feature wall in the shower recess

Bathroom wall tile

 

Entry way floor tiles

 

You occasionally see the use of these tiles in restaurants and cafe’s around Sydney, and in my experience in Bondi, the designers of La Macelleria & Pompeii’s, have created an overwhelming ambiance and visual eye candy that will leave the viewer in awe.

 This is Pompeii’s in Bondi

A cleaver mix of chevron layed, mosaic and arabesque tiles in gloss, matte and a little metallic.

 

 

Patchwork upholstery complements the layering of patterns and textures on the walls and floor

 

 

(images: paddotopalmy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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